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Ilford FP4+ development times from EI 100 to EI 6400


Over the years I’ve built up a large bank of development times and schemes for many black and white films, old and new; and I’m regularly asked about them – especially those for extended push processing over one to two stops. They’re something I happily provide as and when requested.

With #FP4Party having just kicked off (and the first shoot week coming to a close), I thought it was time to share in earnest and start, well, with Ilford FP4+.

The tables below show both real world tested and untested (extrapolated) development times for this film. I don’t use filtered or distilled water for any of my developer solution; it’s all straight out of the tap. My stop bath and fixing chemicals are sometimes mixed with tap water and sometimes with bottled water – I use what’s most convenient for me at the time. I mostly stick with HC-110 these days and have also started experimenting with stand development for extended pushes.

The times listed below may not work for everyone (differences in water quality/hardness/softness, agitation schemes, etc.), however I’ve yet to hear back that any of them were anything other than a success – here’s keeping fingers crossed.

 

A basis for development

I have taken the base ISO for FP4+ as 100, not the published 125. This is a personal preference but for the sake of bringing some order to this and future articles in this theme, I have published the times below with ISO125 as the base speed (N). All other times vary from that as N+/- in full or fractions of stops

In case you’re wondering what “N” is, it’s “normal development” as per Ansel Adams’ Zone System. You can expect a future article covering my take on this pervasive metering and development system in due course but if you’re serious about making the most out of your own photographic process in the meantime, I would strongly recommend that you pick up a copy of “The Negative” for further reading.

Ready? Here we go.

Ilford FP4+ development times – EI 125 – 21C / 70F

Exposure (EI)Pull/PushDeveloperDilutionTemp (°C / °F)AgitationTime
125NIlfotec DD-X1+421C / 70F1st min + 10 secs each min09:45
125NIlfotec LC291+921C / 70F1st min + 10 secs each min03:35
125NIlfotec LC291+1921C / 70F1st min + 10 secs each min08:00
125NKodak HC-1101+19 (C)21C / 70F1st min + 10 secs each min05:15
125NKodak HC-1101+31 (B)21C / 70F1st min + 10 secs each min08:45

 

Ilford Ilfotec DD-X – 1+4 – EI 100-6400 – 21C / 70F

Exposure IndexPush/PullTime
100N-1/309:30
125N09:45
200N+2/312:00
250N+113:30
400N+1 2/317:00
500N+219:00
800N+2 2/323:30

 

Ilford Ilfotec LC29 – 1+9 – EI 100-6400 – 21C / 70F

Exposure IndexPush/PullTime
100N-1/303:15
125N03:35
200N+2/304:30
250N+105:00
400N+1 2/306:15
500N+207:00
800N+2 2/309:00
1000N+310:00
1600N+3 2/312:30
2000N+414:00
3200N+4 2/317:30
4000N+519:30
6400N+5 2/323:30

 

Ilford Ilfotec LC29 – 1+19 – EI 100-6400 – 21C / 70F

Exposure IndexPush/PullTime
100N-1/307:30
125N08:00
200N+2/308:45
250N+109:45
400N+1 2/312:15
500N+213:45
800N+2 2/317:00
1000N+319:00
1600N+3 2/324:00
2000N+427:00
3200N+4 2/334:00
4000N+538:00
6400N+5 2/352:00

 

Kodak HC-110 – 1+19 (Dilution C) – EI 100-6400 – 21C / 70F

Exposure IndexPush/PullTime
100N-1/305:00
125N05:15
200N+2/307:00
250N+107:30
400N+1 2/308:30
500N+209:00
800N+2 2/310:00
1000N+310:45
1600N+3 2/312:00
2000N+412:45
3200N+4 2/314:15
4000N+515:00
6400N+5 2/317:30

 

Kodak HC-110 – 1+31 (Dilution D) – EI 100-6400 – 21C / 70F

Exposure IndexPush/PullTime
100N-1/307:45
125N08:45
200N+2/311:45
250N+112:30
400N+1 2/314:00
500N+214:45
800N+2 2/316:30
1000N+317:30
1600N+3 2/319:30
2000N+421:00
3200N+4 2/323:30
4000N+525:00
6400N+5 2/332:15

 

 

Have your say

Are there any times you were looking for not listed here? Just leave a note in the comments and I’ll update the article. The same goes for developer combinations.

Which film would you like to see next? Leave a note below and I’ll see what I can do.

 

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About The Author

EMULSIVE

Self confessed film-freak and filmphotography mad-obsessive. I push, pull, shoot, boil and burn film everyday, and I want to share what I learn. It might not all be right but it's a start.

8 Comments

  1. Before get old I have to try FP4 @ 6400…

    Reply
  2. nice! So a question. Do you do inversions for the first min or just agitate ?

    Reply
    • Just agitate, I only do inversions when doing semi-stand development.

      Reply
    • I’ll add it in. Any particular dilution/schemes you’re interested in?

      Reply
      • Thanks! Since (a) I live in Israel and I need to ship in all chemicals by post or smuggle them in my luggage and (b) I am a lazy / sloppy developer, I tend to favor high dilutions and semi stand development (Rodinal 100:1 or 50:1, HC-110 Dilution H or G). But I am interested in getting more accurate results and am intrigued by the concept of pushing FP4+.

        If it’s not to much to ask, it would also be great to see sample photos or links for the different combinations you have posted…

  3. I’m I use FP4+ as my standard film in 35mm and 120 but have always used ID-11 as my developer as it was the one I used in school years ago and have never experimented on the grounds I was told keep things consistent then you will get consistent results; therefore, do you have an ID-11 chart squirrelled away somewhere?

    Reply
    • I can pull some published data for you and apply some of my own push processing multipliers. It won’t be perfect but it’ll be somewhere to start. How’s that sound?

      Reply

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