EI 3200

Photography: Open invitation – Shot on Kodak T-MAX 3200 (TMZ) at EI 800 (35mm format)

Open invitation Shot on Kodak T-MAX 3200 (TMZ) at EI 800 Black and white negative film in 35mm format Pull processed 2 stops Leica M6 TTL 0.85 + 7artisans 35mm f/2 (read the lens review)   Development notes Kodak HC-110

Photography: Twins – Shot on Kodak T-MAX 3200 at EI 800 (35mm format)

Twins Shot on Kodak T-MAX 3200 (TMZ) at EI 800 Black and white negative film in 35mm format Pull processed 2 stops Leica M6 TTL 0.85 + 7artisans 35mm f/2 (read the lens review)   Development notes Kodak HC-110 (B

Photography: Condensed – Shot on Kodak T-MAX 3200 at EI 800 (35mm format)

Condensed Shot on Kodak T-MAX 3200 (TMZ) at EI 800 Black and white negative film in 35mm format Pull processed 2 stops Leica M6 TTL 0.85 + 7artisans 35mm f/2 (read the lens review)   Development notes Kodak HC-110 (B

Photography: Royalty – Shot on Kodak T-MAX 3200 at EI 800 (35mm format)

Royalty Shot on Kodak T-MAX 3200 (TMZ) at EI 800 Black and white negative film in 35mm format Pull processed 2 stops Leica M6 TTL 0.85 + 7artisans 35mm f/2 (read the lens review)   Development notes Kodak HC-110 (B

Shooting Kodak Tri-X 400 from EI 800 to EI 12800 (+ development times)

Covering the results of experimenting with Kodak Tri-X 400, this article picks up from my original Kodak Tri-X 400 review and will show you single-stop pushes from EI 400 all the way up to EI 12800.

Film stock review: Kodak TRI-X 400 black and white negative film in 35mm and 120 formats

Kodak TRI-X 400 is the film you want if you're looking for a consistently flexible film that's reliable in all kinds of conditions and to be fair, if you're reading this, you're probably already shooting it.