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Travelogue: Australia part three – Tasmania

Today we’re welcoming Sarah Arnoff back with part three of her Australian travelogue. We’re following on from part one, which covered Sydney and part two, which took a look at Brisbane.

Welcome to part three, the beautiful island of Tasmania.

Over to you, Sarah.

 

If you only have six days on the rugged and rural island of Tasmania, do whatever you can to procure more time there. Our not-quite-a-week was not quite enough time to explore our road trip route from Hobart, west to skim the edge of Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park, north to Cradle Mountain National Park and Stanley, then cutting across central Tasmania to hit Freycinet National Park, Bay of Fires and, finally, ending in Launceston.

The historic and tragic prison walls of Port Arthur were our first stop after getting a crash course in driving on the left side of the road. We spent the night in Hobart with new acquaintances, and took in the views from Mt. Wellington, as well as a majestic natural wonder called the Octopus Tree on the advice of a woman in a yarn shop. And then our road trip began in earnest, as we tore through the many landscapes Tasmania has to offer, from rocky, mountainous terrain; Napa-esque valleys and rolling green hillscapes to dense, wild jungle; bright, azure blue inlets; lichen-covered boulders and miles of bunch grass plains.

Tasmania was astounding to us for many reasons, but the top one being the number of ecosystems and nature preserves that are packed into an area one-eighth the size of Utah (where we’re from). Nature junkies will thrive here.

Tasmania Travelogue - Port Arthur historic prison.

Tasmania Travelogue – Port Arthur historic prison.

Exploring the huge Port Arthur grounds.

Tasmania Travelogue – Exploring the huge Port Arthur grounds.

On the shore near Port Arthur.

Tasmania Travelogue – On the shore near Port Arthur.

Enjoying the view at Port Arthur.

Tasmania Travelogue – Enjoying the view at Port Arthur.

Over the ledge of Mount Wellington.

Tasmania Travelogue – Over the ledge of Mount Wellington.

Tasmania Travelogue - Tasmanian hills.

Tasmania Travelogue – Tasmanian hills.

Untainted wilderness at Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park.

Untainted wilderness at Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park.

Tasmania - Travelogue - Accidental double exposure of some fungi and a suspension bridge on a trail in Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park.

Tasmania – Travelogue – Accidental double exposure of some fungi and a suspension bridge on a trail in Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park.

Tasmania Travelogue - A wombat spotted while hiking in Cradle Mountain National Park.

Tasmania Travelogue – A wombat spotted while hiking in Cradle Mountain National Park.

Tasmania Travelogue - A misty early-April view in Cradle Mountain National Park.

Tasmania Travelogue – A misty early-April view in Cradle Mountain National Park.

Tasmania Travelogue - Mist almost obscures the mountain in Cradle Mountain National Park.

Tasmania Travelogue – Mist almost obscures the mountain in Cradle Mountain National Park.

Tasmania Travelogue - A waterfall pit stop in Waratah. Stop at the road house for a snack and a glimpse of their giant inflatable Tasmanian Tiger.

Tasmania Travelogue – A waterfall pit stop in Waratah. Stop at the road house for a snack and a glimpse of their giant inflatable Tasmanian Tiger.

Tasmania Travelogue - At the top of The Nut in Stanley.

Tasmania Travelogue – At the top of The Nut in Stanley.

Tasmania Travelogue - Bunch grass, wallabies and astounding views can be had on The Nut.

Tasmania Travelogue – Bunch grass, wallabies and astounding views can be had on The Nut.

Tasmania Travelogue - You can climb the short-but-steep trail to the top or take the chairlift. We recommend hiking for the calf workout and the satisfaction of getting to the top.

Tasmania Travelogue – You can climb the short-but-steep trail to the top or take the chairlift. We recommend hiking for the calf workout and the satisfaction of getting to the top.

Tasmania Travelogue - The blue water and green landscapes of Stanley, as seen from The Nut.

Tasmania Travelogue – The blue water and green landscapes of Stanley, as seen from The Nut.

Tasmania Travelogue - On the other side of Tasmania, we have Friendly Beaches in Freycinet National Park.

Tasmania Travelogue – On the other side of Tasmania, we have Friendly Beaches in Freycinet National Park.

Tasmania Travelogue - The bright lichen of Bay of Fires.

Tasmania Travelogue – The bright lichen of Bay of Fires.

Tasmania - More Bay of Fires

Tasmania – More Bay of Fires

Tasmania Travelogue - Even more Bay of Fires

Tasmania Travelogue – Even more Bay of Fires

Bay of Fires was not named for the flame-colored lichen on its boulders, but for the literal fires the indigenous residents would light, which sent up plumes of smoke that could  be seen for miles.

All photos were taken on either a Mamiya 645 or a Zenobia C on a variety of film stocks. They were mostly a titch over exposed on Kodak Ektar 100, Portra 400, Fuji Pro 400H, Provia 100F and Velvia 100. They were processed and scanned by Provo-local Alpine Film Lab (RIP).

~ Sarah Arnoff

 

 

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About The Author

Sarah Arnoff

Sarah Arnoff Yeoman is a documentary, portrait/wedding and travel photographer based in Salt Lake City, Utah.

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