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Reviews

Find all EMULSIVE reviews, covering films, cameras, bags and other film photography gear here.

Discovering Dan K’s “THE LATENT IMAGE”: a unique one-off, one-time photo...

Some weeks ago I got a call from Dan K asking if I was interested in reviewing his new photo book, "The Latent Image".

How to save money with a Nikon Pre-AI camera system –...

The cost of manual-focus 35mm equipment increases to rise and Nikon gear is leading the pack.

Camera review: the flawless BOMM V810 8×10 camera – by Craig...

Flawless finish, consistent operation and engineered like a fine timepiece, the BOMM V810 is a wonder of thought, effort and passion...and my new 8x10 workhorse.

Film stock review: Comparing Kodak Ektar 100 to Fujifilm Velvia 50...

To the analogue landscape photographer, choosing one’s film stock is one of the most crucial steps in the creative process.

The Olympus XA review: how I fell in love with a...

...and back in love with photography again and again. Warning: the following review of the diminutive Olympus XA is highly biased and totally subjective. I love the darn thing and actually own 2 of them.

Camera review: Minolta AF-Tele Super – by Tom Perry

It was always going to come to this point. With compact cameras that sport prime lenses, even though the image quality is as it should be, the photographer is limited to a single set focal length.

Camera review: The Rolleicord 1a – 2 – Model K3 –...

After my first encounters with the Rolleicord 1a - 2 - Model K3 a friend had given me as a present, I decided to take a closer look at this piece of fine engineering.

Satisfying a 37 year dream… My first Nikon F3 – by...

I remember the Nikon F3 being expensive when it first came out in 1980. At the time, a new Nikon F3 with a 50mm lens cost about US$1,175 - that's about US$3,500 adjusted for inflation.

The Wabi-Sabi rangefinder: Yasuhara 一式 T981 (Isshiki T981)

After Shin Yasuhara left his job at Kyocera, the large Japanese high technology company, he set out on designing his own dream camera.

Camera review: 30+ years with the Nikon FG-20 – by Richard...

In 1984 I had just entered my 20s and my pockets were not very deep. Up to that point I had been using a Rolleiflex SL35M, my second SLR, but it had stopped working.

How to make a TEXPan: shoot wide-format 35mm film in the...

In this article, I'll be showing you how to very simply modify your Fuji medium format rangefinder to shoot wide-format 35mm film (aka make your own TEXPan).

Camera Review: Kodak Brownie Hawkeye, Flash Model – by Kikie Wilkins

In 1900, Eastman Kodak introduced the original Brownie camera, the first in a long-running series of affordable, easy-to-use cameras for the general public.

Camera review: the Nikon FE 2 – by Mac MacDonald

Over the past few months, I’ve been trying to settle on “the one.” The one 35mm film camera that will serve all my photography needs.

The Ultimate guide to the Hasselblad 2000FCW, a focal plane shutter...

The Hasselblad 2000FCW was the third in the legendary Swedish company's family of 6x6 focal plane shutter cameras. If you want to be able to use all Hasselblad lenses (including 13 lenses that can only be used with this

Camera review: the Olympus IS-5000 bridge camera – by Tom Perry

2002 was a funny time for film cameras.

Camera review: the Hasselblad 903 SWC – by Richard Forrester

I’ve been photographing with analog cameras for over a decade now and this isn’t my first Hasselblad (previously owning a V-Series 500CM).

Camera review: the RealitySoSubtle 6×12

I have been using digital cameras for the past 20 years. Like many of us, my love of photography began when I was a young using a little Kodak Brownie camera.

My first time with slide film: new Kodak EKTACHROME E100

Most of the frames which make up this mini-review are from the first roll of slide film

Film stock review: Kodak Pro Image 100

I’ll begin this review with a quick disclaimer - I’ve been shooting film for less than a year at this point.

Book review: “Bert Hardy’s Britain” – by James Horrobin

Photography books are a funny thing to me, they’re often big, cumbersome things that are far more expensive than their wordy cousins. If you’re like me and have the attention span of a lemon, the idea of buying what