Kodak Ektar 100; it sounds so exotic and for me it delivers the kind of saturation that makes shooting colour film so fun, but without the reduced latitude that comes with shooting slide film. I was initially skeptical of Ektar as many people (online) said that it produced nasty skin tones, I bought some to find out for myself!

All 5 shots were taken with my trusty Rolleicord Vb and metered using sunny 16 and a MK1 eyeball.

I love the way Kodak Ektar can boost the colours on a gloomy day, I love the skin tones on a bright sunny day in open shade and yes, I’ll also admit skin tones in bright direct sunlight can get pretty funky; seek out some shade and you’ll get amazing skin tones and intense colour pop.

Ektar scans super sharp in both 120 and 35mm and the grain is almost non-existent, I have found quite a difference depending on what scanner is used so keep that in mind if you want to try it for yourself.

Click on the images below to view them in full screen.

It took me a while to find all my Ektar scans; so writing this article has taught me one lesson, always tag your scans with the film used!

Another plus point for shooting Ektar is that it’s usually a good chunk cheaper that other Kodak professional films, I recommend you grab a block and start experimenting with colours that pop.

Thanks for reading.

~ Michael Rennie

 

 

Get involved: submit your 5 Frames With

Getting your 5 frames featured couldn't be simpler: all you need to do is send over 5 frames shot on a single roll of film using the same lens and camera combination. Large format shooter, not a problem! As long as the shots all came from the same film stock, camera and lens, you're good to go.

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Finally, don't forget that this series is being produced in conjunction with Hamish Gill's excellent 35mmc.com. Head on over to read the other half of these stories.

 

 

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