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5 Frames With… #52: Kosmo Foto Mono 100 (EI 100 / 35mm) – by Phil Harrison

I mentioned to EM that my Kosmo film had just arrived and he demanded a 5 Frames With… pronto! So here we are.

Stephen Dowling is the man producing the film, his photoblog is Kosmo FotoStephen’s blog used to be called Zorki Foto and his film was going to be called Zorki Foto Mono100, but this would likely have infringed lots of copyrights, so he recently changed the blog name to Kosmo Foto – an excellent choice, in my opinion, keeping the Russian feel.

Apparently I have a chance of being a Kosmonaut when I send Stephen some photos taken with the film. So in anticipation this is Kosmonaut Harrison’s report!

Kosmo Foto Mono 100 Packshot

Kosmo Foto Mono 100 Packshot

The Kosmo Foto films box artwork is brilliant, they are currently displayed on my bookshelf.

Enough about the box, we’d better look at the film, which only cost me £4 a roll. These images were shot with a Helios 58mm f/2 lens. The film was developed in Fuji Negastar and scanned at AgPhoto Lab (I don’t process myself).

To view the images in full screen, click or tap below.

I popped into Manchester for a few hours, in the evening I went to my photo club’s portrait night and dragged a few club members in front of the lens to finish the roll. (You know what they say…a roll of film a day keeps the doctor away!) I wanted to see how the film faired under high and low contrast lighting. I was impressed when the scans arrived.

The contrast is quite high but retains the highlights. Under high contrast the shadows lost detail as expected. Skin tones are rendered in a pleasant way as can be seen from the studio shots, excuse my portrait skills, never my strong point. In fact it looks an ideal studio film. Kosmo Foto Mono 100 has excellent definition. The film was grainy, more so than ILFORD FP4 PLUS, but pleasantly in a traditional way.

I would encourage people to support these small film producers. This year has been especially kind to us film users with new films and camera bodies.

~ Phil Harrison

 

 

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About The Author

Philip Harrison

Phil spent 25 years as a professional photographer after leaving Photographic College in the mid 1970’s. In his early years, he worked as a medical photographer, based in a hospital in the north of the UK and later came upon a change of direction to industrial photography and film/TV production. In the late 90’s Phil gave up professional photography and trained as a Train Guard, retiring a few years ago. He uses a rangefinder camera and one lens, a 50mm. He feels this makes him work harder and the resultant images are better. He doesn’t specialise with his photography, enjoying photographing anything that appeals.

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  1. I’ve been waiting to see someone post their results from this, I had mine come through the door the other day but have such a backlog of film to get developed from my trip to Italy that it’s going to be some time before I get to use mine. It looks really quite good, the contrast is nice, exactly what I look for in a black and white film.

    Reply

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