Last year I published a short list of analogue photographers who were valuable (at least to me) in some way; ones who offer either inspiration or education. The response to this was very wholesome, and people in the comments seemed to enjoy both the concept of the list and my selection.

I thought it would be useful to re-explore this idea, and to highlight a few more picks for photographers whose work has something worth learning from, or simply enjoying.


IG: Jim Mortram
Web: smalltowninertia.co.uk

Jim’s work is focused around a long term documentary project, which features incredibly intimate scenes, and truly heartbreaking stories. His work is special, and some of the most personable documentary work I’m aware of.


Jahan Saber
Jahan Saber
doyoudevelop.com

IG: Jahan Saber
Web:
doyoudevelop.com

Jahan’s work is very diverse, but he manages to maintain a wonderfully contrasty aesthetic throughout all of his images. He shares so much of his BTS while printing or developing, and is absolutely worth following on Instagram for this insight alone.


IG: Danny Wong
Web: danwongphotography.com

Dan manages to ply a number of different photography formats and techniques in his street and documentary photography, but never allows them to overwhelm, or limit his style. I like the simplicity in many of his images, including the often stripped back colour palette, which allows you to appreciate the often playful subject matter.


Maya Beano
Maya Beano
mayabeano.com

IG: Maya Beano
Web:
mayabeano.com

I think part of the reason I enjoy Maya’s work is because it is just so different from my own. She uses such vibrancy, vivid textures and tones throughout her portfolio, and applies film through all of it’s imperfections: light leak, grain, and unique rendering.


IG: Josh Edgoose
Web:
joshedgoose.photography

I really admire Josh’s ability to maintain a consistent look between his film and digital work. He has such fantastic authority over his style that he’s able to consistently apply it to any scenario he’s presented with. I usually associate the palette he prefers with portrait work, so seeing it used for such energetic scenes is really special.



Winston Duke
Winston Duke
winstonduke.com

IG: Winston Duke
Web:
winstonduke.com

Winston’s work as a motion designer really informs his photographic methods; motion and energy is at the forefront of almost all of his images. His often ghostly results result from his laissez-faire exposure techniques, chemically “imperfect” ways of handling his film, and Lightroom tricks, like double exposures on his final prints.


Joshua Jackson
Joshua Jackson
joshkjack.com

IG: Joshua Jackson
Web:
joshkjack.com

Night/low light photography is often seen as a hurdle for film photography, but Josh managed to transpose his style so gracefully onto film. His work on Cinestill 800 is especially iconic, and a fantastic application of that stock – wonderfully atmospheric.


Pierre Crocquet
Pierre Crocquet
pierrecrocquet.com

IG: Pierre Crocquet
Web:
pierrecrocquet.com

Pierre travelled around Africa working on different projects in the early 2000’s. His work, curated from hundreds of rolls of film, is currently being shared by his sibling, who inherited the collection upon Pierre’s untimely death. Pierre’s work explores some very intense themes; and his final unfinished project, in which he documents people approaching their 100th birthday, is very touching indeed.


IG: Kit Young
Web:
kityoung.co.uk

Kit’s images are fantastically contrasty, and really demonstrate some fantastic ways to use the dynamic range of film to the advantage of the light and composition.


David Babaian
David Babaian
davidbabaian.com

IG: David Babaian
Web:
davidbabaian.com

Part of why I respect David’s film work so much is my understanding of his struggle with film and film cameras. Watching his progress as he finds his stride with the mechanics, chemicals, and overall aesthetics of film for his work has been great, and the payoff is really distinct in his results.


Josh Kern
Josh Kern
kernjosh.com

IG: Josh Kern
Web: kernjosh.com

Josh Kern’s work has a fantastic roughness around the edges, a real sense of grit which I think many film photographers try but fail to achieve. He really embraces all of the imperfections inherent to film photography, and when viewed as a collection it has a very nostalgic and personal feel.


Danny North
Danny North
dannynorth.co

IG: Danny North
Web:
dannynorth.co

I like Danny’s work because it shows an intimate side to the countryside lifestyle I have only ever really dipped into – never really immersing myself in anything other than City Life. I enjoy the characters he finds, and simplicity in the way he presents them.


George Muncey
George Muncey
georgemuncey.com

IG: George Muncey
Web: georgemuncey.com

George’s work is very diverse, but what I really admire is the way he constantly experiments with different aspects of film photography. All kinds of formats and methods, which he helpfully shares via his YouTube channel. A real asset to the film photography community – especially to newcomers looking to see what’s at the very limits of the form.


Upon revisiting this idea I noticed a strong bias towards Street and Documentary photographers, so if anyone knows of any outstanding photographers specialising in analogue portraiture, landscape, wildlife, fine art, food, or any other genre of photography then please do leave them in the comments for others to see!

~ Simon

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