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5 Frames With… Kodak Portra 800 (35mm / EI 800 / Leica M6) – By Phil Harrison5 Frames With… Kodak Portra 800 (35mm / EI 800 / Leica M6) – By Phil Harrison

5 Frames With… Kodak Portra 800 (35mm / EI 800 / Leica M6) – By Phil Harrison

I know EMULSIVE is running a Portraparty, but me being a grumpy old aged pensioner, I don’t have any social media accounts (although I do read some). So hopefully this 5 Frames With… will be allowed.

I have, subconsciously, in the past month put Kodak Porta’s 160, 400 and 800, in that order through the Leica M6, one after the other. I bought a roll of Portra 800 specifically for a trip to the Harry Potter Tour at Leavesden Movie Studios, however, I put the film in the camera too early and took it to an Airfare first. This gave me a chance to look at how it copes with strong sunny lighting as well as movie lighting on the studio tour. The Portra films originate from the wonderful Kodak Vision Movie films, Portra’s 160 and 400 from the more recent VISION 3 and Portra 800 from the older VISION 2.

When Portra 800 works well, it is brilliant, when it goes wrong it’s not so good. 800 does not seem to like very bright overhead sun, it can go grainy, contrasty and have high colour saturation (especially red), this high saturation (but not grain or contrast) under these conditions seems to also be a trait with Portra 160 and 400. Under more soft lighting it’s wonderful, low grain and great colours.

Exposure doesn’t seem to affect the above issues and it has a wide exposure latitude, definition is always good. Despite what happens under direct sun, I still rate the Portra films highly, all have the same look with lovely colours, my favourite is Portra 400.

~ Phil

 

 

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Getting your 5 frames featured couldn't be simpler: all you need to do is send over 5 frames shot on a single roll of film using the same lens and camera combination. Large format shooter, not a problem! As long as the shots all came from the same film stock, camera and lens, you're good to go.

You can submit your article in one of two ways: using this form, or via this page.

Finally, don't forget that this series is being produced in conjunction with Hamish Gill's excellent 35mmc.com. Head on over to read the other half of these stories.

 

 

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About The Author

Philip Harrison

Phil spent 25 years as a professional photographer after leaving Photographic College in the mid 1970’s. In his early years, he worked as a medical photographer, based in a hospital in the north of the UK and later came upon a change of direction to industrial photography and film/TV production. In the late 90’s Phil gave up professional photography and trained as a Train Guard, retiring a few years ago. He mainly uses "standard" lenses (50mm/80mm/150mm depending on format) with his cameras. He feels this makes him work harder and the resultant images are better. He doesn't specialise with his photography, enjoying photographing anything that appeals.

1 Comment

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  1. Barnaby Nutt

    5 more examples of why Portra is my favourite colour film.

    Reply

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