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Film review: Fomapan 400 / Arista EDU Ultra 400

Film review: Fomapan 400 / Arista EDU Ultra 400

I first tried Foma films about eight years ago when I moved to the Czech Republic. Since then I’ve purchased it in both 135 and 120 format, I switched to other brands of film, after that purchasing a bulk roll of Fomapan 100 just to see if I could load cartridges myself – until recently I decided to settle on one film and this film was Fomapan 400.

It was an easy decision to make because by that time it became my favourite 400 film.

 

Fomapan 400 at EI 800

Fomapan 400 at EI 800

 

Before I continue with the review I need to note that these days I use my Olympus XA almost exclusively, so I will talk about 135 format mainly.

Though in my experience this film behaves the same regardless of the size – same contrast, same shadow detail, etc. except for the grain, which is more apparent in the small format of course.

 

Fomapan 400 at EI 800

Fomapan 400 at EI 800

 

The only difference between 135 and 120 formats worth mentioning is the base curl. While 120 film curls a bit lengthwise after drying, 135 stays perfectly flat. In fact I’ve never had Ilford or Kodak films dry that flat.

 

Fomapan 400 at EI 1600

Fomapan 400 at EI 1600

 

Since I already mentioned grain, let’s cover this aspect first. Fomapan’s grain is quite fine for an ISO400 traditional cubic grained emulsion. It has a regular and pleasing structure and is at least on par with similar films from Tier 2 brands if not marginally better. Many say that these days it looks more Kodak Tri-X than Tri-X itself.

As with all other black and white films grain size and structure can be altered with the choice of developer – Rodinal will accentuate grain, while Perceptol will give you the smoothest tonalities possible.

 

Fomapan 400 at EI 400

Fomapan 400 at EI 400

 

I think I mostly like this film because of it’s distinct look, some people use the word character, defined by the classic grain structure and lovely tonality it provides. It prints really nice, the grain doesn’t distract even at 30×40 size enlarged from 135 format. If I want to get even smaller grain and/or to lower the contrast of a scene, I expose it at EI125-160 and shorten development time by 1/3. This way the grain becomes almost inconspicuous at 30×40, certainly comparable to best in class traditional (not T-grain) ISO100 films.

 

Fomapan 400 at EI 125

Fomapan 400 at EI 125

 

Shooting mostly with Olympus XA I found that EI800 works best for me, I can get faster shutter speeds at low light while keeping sunny scenes manageable. This means that I almost always push Fomapan 400 by one stop. If I need to shoot hand-held at night I will uprate this film to EI1600 and get good results with prolonged development in diluted X-tol.

Of course with this film’s latitude correct measuring is critical. I don’t own a light meter, but I found out that a digital point-and-shoot set to B&W with maximum contrast can be used to “pre-visualize” the scene. After that I transfer exposure parameters to my Canon 50 and get the picture I want.

 

Fomapan 400 at EI 1600

Fomapan 400 at EI 1600

 

Anti-halation layers in Foma films are not in the same league as the ones of Kodak/Ilford, which make the final picture a bit softer and flooded with light. I don’t consider this to be an issue at all, I love the glow that occurs in the adjacent bright/dark areas and it can be very useful in portraiture.

 

Fomapan 400 at EI 1600

Fomapan 400 at EI 1600

 

Another lesser-known feature of Fomapan 400 is it’s near infrared sensitivity. My recipe for IR shots with this film is to dial E I6 and let the camera measure through the IR 720nm filter. This way I get quite predictable results with my Canon 50.

 

Fomapan 400 at E I6 shot through R72 filter

Fomapan 400 at E I6 shot through R72 filter

 

As with all IR films one needs to bracket (mainly on the + side), because intensity of IR radiation varies a lot during the day and also depends on a number of factors including weather conditions, time of the year, etc.

 

Fomapan 400 from left to right: no filter EI400, R72 EI6, R72 EI6 +2

Fomapan 400 from left to right: no filter EI400, R72 EI6, R72 EI6 +2

 

FOMA also makes a line of tremendous black and white papers and darkroom chemicals both very reasonably priced. I use their Fomatone and Fomabrom papers and many of their chemistry products including film and paper developers, wash aid, stop bath, fixer and even sepia toner.

 

Fomapan 400 at EI 800

Fomapan 400 at EI 800

 

In conclusion Fomapan 400 (Arista EDU Ultra 400) is an excellent mid range film at a good price, but you might want to do some quick testing to find developing times and EIs that suit you best. It’s well worth a try.

~ Alex Kurganov

 

 

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About The Author

Alex Kurganov

I'm a self-taught photographer based in Prague, CZ. My favorite subject is landscape, but I tend to photograph whatever captures my eye or imagination.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. I am Alex Kurganov and this is why I shoot film | EMULSIVE Interviews - […] grabbed some time with Alex Kuraganov, whom you may remember from his excellent review of Fomapan 400 / Arista…
  2. All the 35mm film you can still buy: Part 1 – Adox to Fomapan – Zorki Photo - […] Fomapan 400’s a softer film, and it doesn’t capture the same biting dark tones that Tri-X can for example.…

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