Select Page

Blue hour with Kodak Ektar 100 – by Toni Skokovic

Blue hour with Kodak Ektar 100 – by Toni Skokovic

I’ve started getting into film photography more seriously over the past 18 months; and testing different films has been a huge part of discovering the right technology and technique.

My goal has been to evaluate different looks and determine if film opens additional creative opportunities.

This is how I found Kodak Ektar. Much has been written about this film but for me, I find Kodak Ektar at its most unique under unusual lighting conditions and when exposed in a somewhat unconventional fashion.

My first roll was a disaster. I ended up shooting with my camera’s meter set to EI 400, so the roll was underexposed by two stops. Still, this outing was not a total loss; and in the sea of underexposed frames, I found a very unique palette of rich tones between red and blue. Blue hour, as it turns out, seems to be the best time to get the most unique results out of this film.

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

 

 

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

 

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

 

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

 

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

Morning twilight is the best time to get deep, rich, and moody tones out of Ektar.

This film seems to render the transition from deep blue darkness to bright yellow sunlight with a grace that seems impossible to coax out of any digital detector. Exposing for this dramatic palette requires a little bit of experimentation, however.

During twilight – with the Sun hiding behind the horizon – I got the most pleasing results when exposing for highlights. At sunrise, however, I would shift to expose for shadows. This works for about first half an hour of sunlight. As Sun races up, Ektar’s colours tend to start looking more average.

Outside of blue hour, Ektar creates an interesting look under overcast skies. Reds, yellows and greens are intense, while the blue spectrum seems grey and subdued. This lends photographs a patina of sorts, a feel of a more distant world.

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

 

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

 

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

 

 

Blue Hour - Kodak Ektar 100

Blue Hour – Kodak Ektar 100

Blue-green fresh waters take a hue of understated emerald tones and long exposures produce almost an alien cast over the images. The exposure in these conditions seems straightforward – basic mid-tone exposure will ensure an even look, allowing the colour and cast to play the foreground role in a low contrast scene.

Kodak Ektar is a fascinating film. With a little experimentation in sub-standard lighting conditions, it offers a range of creative options. Rich colours and powerful pastel tones allow for both moody and exhilarating interpretation of landscape scenes.

When I develop a roll of Ektar, I am instantly inspired to head out the next morning and shoot another one.

This film seems to have a limitless creative potential, but it may be wasted on a sunny day.

~ Toni Skokovic

 

 

Contribute to EMULSIVE

EMULSIVE NEEDS YOU. The driving force behind EMULSIVE is knowledge transfer, specifically engendering more of it in the film photography community. You can help by contributing your thoughts, work and ideas.

Help drive an open, collaborative community – all you need do is drop us a line and we’ll work something out.

 




About The Author

Toni Skokovic

I am a Toronto, Canada, based enthusiast photographer. Railroads and nature have always fascinated me, a strange combo. With a lack of drawing talent, photography is the only way for me to attempt at capturing what I see and how I feel about the world around me. I have discovered film photography just recently (2015). To me, film offers unique ways to extend creative possibilities and build more technical discipline.

8 Comments

  1. EM turned me on to your article here. I am looking to do the same thing with Ektar. I live outside of DC and using PhotoPills have figured out when and where to be in order to catch the sunrise. I will be using my Bronica so the metering will be handheld. Did you spot the shadows, highlights, or just take a general light reading and adjust the exposure to where you wanted it (assuming that the general reading would give you a middle 5 and you want to adjust to make the highlights brighter)?

    Reply
    • Jarrod – thanks for the question. Always spot metering for the hi-lights. Underexposing shadows and mid-tones by a stop or two (usually just before the sun is up there is about 2 stop differential between hi-lights and mid-tones) brings out these lovely colours. I am using Pocket LightMeter app on my iPhone for this metering and it has served me well for the past few years.

      Reply
  2. Love the tones. I’ll have to shoot some on my morning drive to work along the coast. Thanks for the inspiration. How do you digitize? Lab or home?

    Reply
    • Hello Chris – sorry for delay in responding – big time ;). Thank you for the comment and the question. I develop and digitize at home, I am using C-41 kit from Argentix, photo supplies store in Montreal, Canada and Epson V600 scanner. Typically, I will scan all colour negatives at 3200dpi and 48-bit colour depth.

      Reply
  3. Hi Tony beautiful images. I find that Ektar loves light and shooting it at 80 I get good results. The characteristic blue shown in your shots shows as a marvelous blue with a slight emerald tint. Last weekend I shot a roll at 80 ISO at mid morning at the beach and was pleased.

    Reply

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Long exposure film tests part one: ILFORD PAN F+, ILFORD FP4+, ILFORD Delta 100 Professional | EMULSIVE | Filed under: Experiments, Long Exposure - […] This is a crude method that roughly brackets most typical reciprocity adjustment curves – something the app does not…

Add your voice to the discussion

EMULSIVE in your inbox

Recent Tweets

Pin It on Pinterest

Get EMULSIVE updates to your inbox

Get EMULSIVE updates to your inbox

Join our daily and weekly newsletters to receive the latest from EMULISVE.

* indicates required
EMULSIVE News

You have successfully subscribed. Please check your email for our confirmation link.

%d bloggers like this: